The mediums are oil on canvas or pastel on paper. Pieces can be bought framed or unframed. Prices range from $750 for small landscapes to $20,000 for large figure pieces. Commissions including portraits are also available, for quotes contact Lisa.

Lisa Bormann's studio work centers on the figures, nudes, interiors, and portraits. She works in a range of techniques from direct painting to indirect methods incorporating underpainting and glazing. Landscapes are done on site with the impressionist's goal of truth in color and value. The core of this work is the direct expression of a sensibility confronting nature, the sitter in the studio posing multiple times for a portrait, the snow scene on site, always at the same time and conditions, sometimes over multiple years if necessary.

Winner in American Artist's Golden Anniversary National competition in figure painting, Lisa Bormann started studying drawing at the School of Fine Arts in Malaga, Spain, when she was seventeen. She spent her sophomore college year studying history and literature in Vienna, then graduated from Stanford University, where she won the James Birdsall Weter prize for distinguished history honors thesis.

Lisa Bormann spent four years at Atelier Lack, a studio school teaching the fundamentals of drawing and painting from life. This program descended directly from the system of teaching brought to Boston by American Impressionists such as Tarbell, Paxton, and Chase, after their study in Europe during the late nineteenth century. Drawing was based on three hours of life drawing every day, study of human anatomy and memory drawing. Painting emphasized the study of values and impressionist color. Bormann explored her own interest in placing the figure in contemporary interiors and portraiture and followed these studies with trips to Europe to paint portrait commissions and landscapes.

Bormann enjoys annual trips for prolonged stays in northern and southern Minnesota. A summer month on the north shore of Lake Superior and fall in the great valley of the Mississippi at Lake Pepin provide the time and familiarity needed for the serious pursuit of landscape painting.